Activities

Helping Preschoolers Develop Hobbies

Author: Maria Cannon

Preschool is an exciting time. For the first time, your baby is out having his or her first experiences of independence. Your child is developing their own interests and experimenting with those interests. It is the perfect opportunity to start introducing new hobbies to encourage learning and help them build self-confidence as they explore and accomplish.

Music Lessons

Music has so many helpful benefits. In fact, some studies suggest that music can even relieve pain. As far as your preschooler is concerned, listening to music and learning to play an instrument is great for brain development. Music teaches children how to be creative while also refining their math skills, so both side A and side B of the brain benefit.

To get your child interested in music lessons, look for a local school that specializes in teaching children. These institutes often offer introductory classes for preschool-age children where they can touch and experience different instruments and determine which ones they would like to learn. Start with a smaller, entry-level version of their chosen instrument and work toward investing in a better model as your child becomes more serious about this hobby.

Backyard Astronomy

If your family lives in an area unaffected by light pollution, take advantage of your unique position and introduce your child to the exciting world of backyard astrology. Learning about the stars at a young age helps your child grasp the infinite nature of the universe and all its possibilities. Exploring the constellations and other astronomical elements develops a sense of direction and enables complex problem-solving.

To gauge your child’s interest in astronomy, plan a trip to your local planetarium or introduce them to Neil deGrasse Tyson. A telescope isn’t necessary, but it can be helpful and motivating. Before you invest in an expensive piece of equipment, get an accurate read on your child’s interest with these hands-on astronomy activities.

Rock Collecting and Geocaching

Rocks get a bad rap. Sure, on the scale from animal to vegetable to mineral, rocks are the only one that you can’t really eat… but that doesn’t make them boring. Children, in particular, are good when it comes to appreciating our earth’s minerals and what makes them beautiful and unique.

Two great ways to tap into your child’s inner geologist:

Art Classes

If your child comes home from preschool with doodles all over their work, help them channel their creativity with art lessons that give them the skills they need to create the way they’ve always dreamed. Art lessons for kids vary from simple drawing introductory courses to more advanced painting classes. Try signing your child up for a variety of lessons so they can experiment with different mediums while learning how to express themselves.

Science Experiments

Is your child an intellectual explorer? Encourage their interest in STEM subjects by orchestrating various science experiments you can do in the comfort of your own home. There are a plethora of kids’ science experiment ideas online — just look at this Rainbow Magic Milk Experiment. Using whole milk, dish soap and food coloring, your child can learn about chemical reactions while also playing with pretty colors.

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As your child enters preschool, their newfound independence encourages them to develop new interests. Help encourage this process by introducing fun and educational hobbies. Music lessons encourage brain development while stimulating both their creative and practical sides. Backyard astronomy helps little kids discover just how big the universe actually is. Rock collecting and geocaching is a hobby for children whose feet are firmly planted on the ground. Art classes help creative children learn to channel their energy and talent. Finally, a fun science experiment is always a good idea for preschool-age children.

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